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Oracle Apex Basics: Locking access by IP Address

Intro:

This series of posts is focused on providing guides for smaller, more specific parts of Oracle Apex, to help users incorporate these features easily into their own applications. I'll be focusing on features that I myself struggled to find reference to when initially starting to use apex, so hopefully these posts help others in search of the same functionality. 

Our Objective:

Here I will be outlining how you lock access to an application by it's IP address, particularly useful when trying to match the security settings of your other platforms. For instance there's no point in locking Oracle Planning's access by IP whilst keeping metadata from it stored in an Apex application that isn't.

Lets Begin:

First within our Oracle Cloud console simply head to "Autonomous Data Warehouse" then click on the ADW you wish to IP lock.


Then within that go to "More Actions" and select "Access Control List".


From here we can add the IP addresses we wish to allow access to our ADW, be aware that your IP address may not be static, this would be something worth looking into if you are using this for private use.


It's also worth noting you have other options to choose from here such as "CIDR Block", "Virtual Cloud Network",  and "Virtual Cloud Network (OCID)".


From here your IP lock is complete and access to your ADW will be securely locked down to your desired IP address.

Thanks for reading,

You can read many other useful Oracle EPM Cloud and Netsuite ERP blogs posted by my colleagues at Brovanture here

-Richard

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